The power struggle. Sony and Microsoft tug of war.

November 5, 2013
in Category: Gaming, The Blog
1 1839 0
The power struggle. Sony and Microsoft tug of war.

The power struggle. Sony and Microsoft tug of war.

Issues with Resolution on the Xbox One.

In a recent interview between Mark Rubin of Infinity Ward and Eurogamer, it was revealed that the newest Call of Duty: Ghosts could not reach 1080p resolution on the Xbox One, but instead would be released at 720p with an upscale conversion. Conversely the same game would run at 1080p on the PlayStation 4, pointing out a possible early weakness for the Xbox One.

The long and short of the story was resource allocation. Rubin commented on dealing with a long time issues with resolution on the Xbox One, trying to “make the best decision for each platform that gives you the best-looking game we could get and maintains that 60 frames a second.” Unfortunately the Xbox One has loads of reserve GPU for the Microsoft operating system. “It’s very possible we can get it to native 1080p.” Rubin admits, “I mean I’ve seen it working at 1080p native. It’s just we couldn’t get the frame rate in the neighborhood we wanted it to be.”

call of duty ghosts,gameplay,squads,nerd farm blogMark Rubin is already looking past their first attempt at an Xbox One and PS4 AAA launch title admitting, “First launch, first time at bat at a new console is a challenging one. That’s just the way it is. For people fearful one system is more powerful than the other or vice versa, it’s a long game.” A long game, after all’s said and done, we’re left with the long game. That’s where I think Rubin has missed some of the fears that are rightfully coming from Microsoft and its fans. Sure the games resolution will be upscaled to 1080p, but that doesn’t numb the fact that the first attempt could only reach 720p.

Sony now has the upper hand in the battle for console supremacy very, very early. Much earlier than most people anticipated. This isn’t some game coming from a small developer, this is a known AAA franchise with almost endless resources and Microsoft engineers at their disposal, and they still couldn’t pull off a resolution on the Xbox One of 1080p and 60 fps. This is a big deal!

sebastion vettel,donuts,4 time champion,nerd farm blogSo,the long game, with the Xbox One already behind the 8-ball, now having to play catch up. I believe it’s still a big deal, and I’ll use a racing analogy to prove my point, and hopefully not lose too many people following this in the process. Formula 1 racing, the fastest, most popular, most expensive, and most technologically advanced race series on the planet has teams that use and build their own cars. Red Bull Racing this season grabbed the constructor world championship with every other team struggling to keep up. A team like Mercedes AMG had been making small improvements on their car throughout the year, greatly improving its performance. But here’s my point, so was Red Bull Racing. They’re not going to stop improving their car just because they’re winning, they’re going to keep plugging away and making their car the best it can be.

This is where Sony is. You think Sony is like, cool, we made a more powerful machine at launch, we can stop now. No, they’re going to keep improving, developers are going to keep getting the most out of the system earlier, and Xbox One will be stuck pushing out 720p games.  Microsoft is going to have to somehow figure out how to help the developers get the most out the Xbox One’s CPU, or this is going to be a long and tedious console generation for Microsoft.

Xbox One Resolutiongate: Call of Duty: Ghosts dev Infinity Ward responds by Wesley Yin-Poole [Source: Eurogamer]

Xbox One Resolutiongate: the 720p fallout by Richard Leadbetter [Source: Eurogamer]

Farm On!

 

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Burke

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  1. Pingback: No live streaming from the Xbox One at launch sounds worse than it is. | Nerd Farm

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